General Anesthesia/IV Sedation

General Anesthesia/IV Sedation

The use of local anesthesianitrous oxide, or intravenous sedation is available and universally used during office based oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures.

  • Local anesthesia is the approach where only the nerves to the surgical site are anesthetized (numbed) for the procedure. The patient will be awake and completely aware of the procedure and will be allowed to eat and drive themselves to and from the office. Local anesthesia is also used in nitrous oxide and IV sedation.
  • Nitrous Oxide (“laughing gas”) is a colorless and odorless gas that the patient will breathe during the procedure to reduce anxiety. Once the procedure is over, the gas will be flushed from the patient’s system with oxygen.       The patient will remember the procedure and will be able to drive themselves to and from the office.
  • Intravenous sedation (conscious or twilight sedation) is defined as a depressed level of consciousness, with the ability to respond to verbal commands. Most patient will not remember their surgery with this type of anesthesia.

Patients having IV sedation will need to have a responsible adult drive them to and from the office, and must not have anything to eat or drink, with the exception of prescription medications for at least six before to surgery. The final decision regarding the type of anesthesia will be determined by the doctor and patient during the consultation.

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